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“press release”
6
Sterile neutrinos through Earth's core
Monday, August 8, 2016 - 10:00am

In an effort to fill in the blanks of the Standard Model of particle physics, science has been conducting a diligent search for a hypothesized particle known as the “sterile neutrino.” Now, with the latest results from an icy particle detector at the South Pole, scientists are almost certain that there is no such particle.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 - 8:00am
The National Science Foundation today, March 30, announced that it has renewed a cooperative agreement with the University of Wisconsin–Madison to operate IceCube, a massive neutrino telescope buried deep in the ice beneath the South Pole. The five-year, $35 million cooperative agreement calls for the continued operation and management of the observatory located at NSF’s Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 10:00am
Sorting through the billions of subatomic particles that zip through its frozen cubic-kilometer-sized detector each year, researchers using the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have gathered powerful new evidence in support of 2013 observations confirming the existence of cosmic neutrinos.
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Wednesday, October 1, 2014 - 11:00am
Justin Vandenbroucke, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of physics and researcher at the Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC), leads the development of an app that can turn your cell phone into a cosmic ray detector.
HAWC graphic
Friday, March 20, 2015 - 1:15pm
High on a sleeping Mexican volcano, a new particle astrophysics observatory is about to blink to life, commencing an all-sky search for very high energy gamma rays — a search that could greatly expand the catalog of known gamma ray sources and chip away at the mystery of the cosmic rays that constantly bombard our planet.
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Thursday, November 21, 2013 - 1:15pm
Today, nearly 25 years after the pioneering idea of detecting neutrinos in ice, the IceCube Collaboration announces the observation of 28 very high-energy particle events that constitute the first solid evidence for astrophysical neutrinos from cosmic accelerators. Details of this research will be published tomorrow, November 22, in Science.