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icecube completion crew
Friday, December 18, 2015 - 1:00pm
Decades ago, the aspiration to build a kilometer-scale neutrino detector at the South Pole seemed farfetched; today, we celebrate the 5-year anniversary of this incredible achievement.
drill
Friday, December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm
Building a cubic-kilometer telescope at the South Pole seemed a chimera even for some of those involved in the project. The goal was simple in words but seemingly impossible in practice: 86 boreholes, each 60 cm in diameter and 2,500 m deep, had to be drilled and instrumented in seven austral summer seasons.
PINGU map
Wednesday, December 17, 2014 - 8:15am
Prof. Olga Botner, IceCube spokesperson and a physics professor at the University of Uppsala, and Prof. Francis Halzen, IceCube principal investigator and a professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, tell us about the plans for an upgrade to the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
HAWC array
Monday, October 27, 2014 - 2:30pm
Puebla is again seeing dozens of physicists wandering in their streets these days, as researchers from the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory get together for their biannual collaboration meeting.
icecube
Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 3:00pm
Yet another year has come to an end for IceCube with plenty of new science results, an always growing international collaboration, and plans for an update to the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
Physics Run graphic
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 10:00am
Not everyone begins a new year on January 1, right? That includes IceCubers, who decided a while ago that mid-May would be a good time to start a new year of data for the South Pole neutrino observatory.
event
Wednesday, February 6, 2013 - 12:00pm
From its vantage point at the geographic South Pole in Antarctica, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory is uniquely positioned to see neutrinos—mysterious, nearly massless, difficult-to-detect particles that are plentiful but little understood.
IMG_0562
Friday, December 6, 2013 - 2:00pm
Austral summers are not as exciting as they once were for IceCube. There are no more strings to be deployed, and the detector is performing impressively. But still, getting as much data as possible from this huge telescope buried in the Antarctic ice depends on how much can be done at the South Pole during a few months with daylight and reasonable temperatures.
physics_world_breakthrough
Friday, December 13, 2013 - 4:30pm
The IceCube project has been awarded the 2013 Breakthrough of the Year by the British magazine Physics World. The Antarctic observatory has been selected for making the first observation of cosmic neutrinos, but also for overcoming the many challenges of creating and operating a colossal detector deep under the ice at the South Pole.
131122HR
Thursday, November 21, 2013 - 1:15pm

Today, nearly 25 years after the pioneering idea of detecting neutrinos in ice, the IceCube Collaboration announces the observation of 28 very high-energy particle events that constitute the first solid evidence for astrophysical neutrinos from cosmic accelerators. Details of this research will be published tomorrow, November 22, in Science.

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